Thursday, March 16, 2017

COW/CALF CORNER The Newsletter From the Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service March 13, 2017



COW/CALF CORNER
The Newsletter

From the Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service
March 13, 2017

In this Issue:

Global trade of U.S. meat
Derrell S. Peel, Oklahoma State University Extension Livestock Marketing Specialist

Schedule the breeding soundness exams soon
by Glenn Selk, Oklahoma State University Emeritus Extension Animal Scientist



Global trade of U.S. meat
Derrell S. Peel, Oklahoma State University Extension Livestock Marketing Specialist

The increased role of trade in the last decade for beef, pork and poultry highlights the importance of trade to all the meat markets. While trade of the meats individually is the focus of each industry, it is apparent that all meat sectors are increasingly affected by the trade of each meat.  This is especially the case when trade policies that will affect all meats are considered.  Changes or disruptions in trade of individual meats often has impacts on other meats in various international markets and has impacts on domestic meat supplies, consumption and prices in U.S. markets.

Net exports of combined beef, pork and poultry have increased over time.  Imports of all meat have been relatively constant at about 4.7 percent of domestic meat production since 1960.  1992 was the first year that meat exports exceeded meat imports resulting in positive net meat exports. Exports of meat have averaged 12.3 percent of production since 1992 compared to 1.3 percent from 1960 to 1991.  Exports of meat exceeded five percent of production for the first time in 1992 and grew rapidly for beef, pork and poultry in the 1990s with total meat exports exceeding 10 percent of production by 1996.  Total meat exports have exceeded double-digit percentages of production since 1996 except for 2004, which dropped briefly to 9.5 percent of total production (largely due to reduced beef exports as a result of BSE).  With lower meat imports in recent years and continued strong exports, net meat exports have exceeded double-digit levels since 2008, averaging 12.0 percent from 2008-2016 with exports averaging 16.1 percent and imports averaging 4.1 percent of production.  2016 net meat exports were 11.0 percent of domestic production, up from 2015 levels but lower than peak net exports of 13.7 percent in 2011 and 2012.  Net meat exports are expected to continue improving year over year in 2017 with exports increasing and imports declining year over year.  Net meat exports are projected to approach 12 percent of production in 2017 assuming no unexpected changes or disruptions.  Any number of disease incidents or political changes in the U.S. or globally could impact this forecast. 

The top five countries for total meat exports in 2016 were: Mexico (23.6 percent); Japan (12.9 percent); Canada (8.3 percent); South Korea (6.3 percent) and Hong Kong (5.4 percent).  The top five countries accounted for 56.5 percent of meat exports with the NAFTA market accounting for 31.9 percent and the three Asian markets accounting for 24.6 percent of total meat exports.  These five countries accounted for 82.6 percent of beef exports; 74.7 percent of pork exports and 32.2 percent of poultry exports.  All five countries were important markets for beef, pork and poultry in 2016, with the exception of no poultry exports to Japan and less than five percent of total poultry exports going to South Korea. Other important markets tend to be dominated by individual meats.  For example, 85.7 percent of Caribbean meat exports are poultry (4.7 percent of total meat exports); China, 99 percent is pork (3.5 percent of total meat exports); and Taiwan, 87.7 percent is beef (1.1 percent of total meat exports).

Meat imports are heavily dominated by beef imports, which accounted for 71.1 percent of meat imports in 2016.  Pork accounted for another 25.8 percent of meat imports.  Beef trade is much more complex than other meats with many diverse product markets and the massive impact of the ground beef market.  In 2016, it is estimated that 45 percent of U.S. domestic beef consumption was ground beef.  An estimated 71 percent of beef imports were trimmings used for ground beef; with imported trimmings providing about 48 percent of the lean trimmings needed for ground beef production. 


Oklahoma State University, in compliance with Title VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Executive Order 11246 as amended, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and other federal laws and regulations, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, disability, or status as a veteran in any of its policies, practices or procedures. This includes but is not limited to admissions, employment, financial aid, and educational services.  References within this publication to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, service mark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not constitute or imply endorsement by Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service.

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Garden Minute - Winter Injury



2/28/2017

This is Jason Lamb with your Gardening Minute.

Winter injury is a common problem here in New Mexico that most often effects pine trees. During the first week of January we had relatively high temperatures during the day at about 60 degree and then received below zero temperatures at night. This large temperature swing has affected our pine trees in here in Quay County. 

Winter Injury is cause by the weather. Warm days followed by extremely cold nights freeze deep into the ground locking up available nutrients and moisture. Most trees will recover but not until spring. 

Trees that show signs of winter injury have pliable branches on the new growth and the needles are brown and dying but the base of the needles are still green in color. 

There is not much that home owners can do about Winter Injury. Water the tree around the dripline of the tree during these winter months about once a week. Don’t fertilize as it will do more damage to the tree at this time.  Don’t prune off dead branches yet or cut down the tree because some of the trees will make it to the spring. 

From more information about Winter Injury please contact us at the Cooperative Extension Office at 461-0562.  This has been your Gardening Minute with Jason Lamb your Quay County Ag. Extension Agent. Where are programs are open to everyone.

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Garden Minute - Pruning Roses



Feb. 15th, 2017

This is Jason Lamb with your Gardening Minute.
Roses are one of the most popular garden plants and it’s time to think about pruning your roses.

Pruning improves the quality of the blooms, regulates the size and shape of the plant, and removes diseased and damaged parts. There is always a question about how much to cut back a rose bush. The time and amount to prune depends on the type of rose, variety, location, and vigor. Hybrid tea roses should be pruned in late winter or about two weeks before the last freeze.

Pruning roses higher will produce more flowers early, while shorter pruning produces fewer but bigger flowers later. The basic technique for most pruning is to cut at a 45-degree angle, 1/4-inch above the nearest outward-facing bud with the higher point above the bud. First remove any dead, broken, damaged, or blotched canes. Roses prefer full sun, so pruning should be done in a bowl shape to maximize the sunlight on the plant.

Floribundas and Climbing roses should be pruned less, only topping the plants to promote vigorous growth.

From more information about pruning roses please contact us at the Cooperative Extension Office at 461-0562.  This has been your Gardening Minute with Jason Lamb your Quay County Ag. Extension Agent. Where are programs are open to everyone.